“We’re not violent offenders. We’re individuals who committed violent crimes. But we’re different people now.”
— Robert Barton

“We’re not violent offenders. We’re individuals who committed violent crimes. But we’re different people now.”

— Robert Barton

Everyone
deserves
a second
chance.

Everyone
deserves a
second chance.

Middle aged Black man wearing a baseball cap looking at camera with neutral expression.
Middle aged Black man with beard and baseball cap looking into distance with neutral expression.
Middle aged Black man wearing a baseball cap looking at camera with neutral expression.
Middle aged Black man with beard and baseball cap looking into distance with neutral expression.

More Than Our Crimes amplifies the voices of the nearly 200,000 Americans in federal prison — many of them people of color. While they were once convicted of serious crimes, our members are ready for a second chance to live freely and contribute to their families and society. Meanwhile, we advocate for a humane prison environment that is centered on rehabilitation.

Podcast

Voices Unlocked

We share unvarnished stories from inside America’s federal prison system to touch hearts and change minds.

Documentary

This is What Redemption Looks Like

Too many Americans grow up in disadvantaged communities and are sucked into the “justice” system. In “Redemption,” we look at two such individuals and the work they are doing to demonstrate the power of second chances.

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Explore Our Voices

Prisons are erected not only to confine, but to prevent those on the outside from seeing in. Few people other than those inside have a full view of how they operate. We’re out to change that.
yellow duotone of chain link fence, surveillance camera and barbed wire fence

Dispatches from Inside

Personal narratives on life “behind the wall”

close-up of dark-skinned hands with fingers on chain link fence

Reform Debate

Perspectives on social reform

close-up of dark-skinned hands with fingers on chain link fence
yellow duotone photo of prison cell from outside

Walk in Our Shoes

Personal stories from incarcerated residents from across the United States